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our kickstarter needs you!

Added on by Erin White.

We are getting our kickstarter on, raising money to produce a booklet series on local food, and we need your support! (plus, you'll love our video)

OPEN FOOD is a series of single topic booklets that introduce, explain and share various parts of local food systems. Our goal for the OPEN FOOD booklet series is to build participation in the food system.  We are designing these booklets to spark conversations about local food systems with information and graphics that are easy to share. All the details at our kickstarter page.

OPEN FOOD TITLE IMAGE2.jpg

An earlier blog post on the project tells it this way: "Because urban agriculture is a frequently misunderstood yet rapidly growing phenomenon with immense benefits, our design team is currently working on a booklet series meant to inform readers about urban agriculture and local food."

Take a moment to explore our campaign! Hope you love it, share it, and decide to become a backer. We'd love to have you on board!

urban ag booklet series

Added on by Erin White.

Because urban agriculture is a frequently misunderstood yet rapidly growing phenomenon with immense benefits, our design team is currently working on a booklet series meant to inform readers about urban agriculture and local food. After sifting through countless reports and studies, the booklets will engage readers with easily digestible, graphic representations distilled from complex empirical data.

 working sketch of benefits that urban farms bring to cities

working sketch of benefits that urban farms bring to cities

The first booklet focuses on the various potential returns on investment in multiple forms of urban ag, including community gardens, urban farms, residential gardens and market farms. We are finding that cities benefit from increases in tax revenue and lower municipal costs, communities benefit from better health and social connections, and local economies benefit by multiplying the spending power of local dollars.

Families who participate in community gardening are able to offset typically 30 to 40 percent of their produce needs by eating food grown in their own gardens
— http://www.policylink.org/atf/cf/%7B97C6D565-BB43-406D-A6D5-ECA3BBF35AF0%7D/URBAN%20AG_FULLREPORT_WEB1.PDF

Our plan is to launch a kickstarter campaign to cover printing costs of this first booklet, and then continue the series from there with topics on community gardening, urban ag zoning explanations, urban livestock, and more. If you have topics that you'd like to see explored please let us know!